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Can PCOS be mistaken?

Yes, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) can be mistaken or misdiagnosed as several other conditions. There are a lot of conditions that share some common symptoms with PCOS, which can sometimes lead to the misdiagnosis or incorrect diagnosis.

One of the common conditions that cause symptoms similar to PCOS is hypothyroidism, a condition where a thyroid gland in a person’s neck does not produce enough hormones. Hypothyroidism causes many similar symptoms to PCOS, such as weight gain, fatigue, and irregular periods. As a result, some people with hypothyroidism can be mistaken for having PCOS and vice versa.

Another condition that shares similar symptoms with PCOS is Adult-Onset Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (AOCAH). AOCAH is a rare genetic condition that affects the adrenal glands, which produce hormones needed for the body’s metabolic processes. Symptoms of AOCAH include hirsutism, or excess hair growth, irregular periods, and acne, all of which are also common in PCOS.

Because of this, some people with AOCAH might be diagnosed with PCOS, and vice versa.

Furthermore, some women might experience ovarian cysts without having PCOS. Ovarian cysts are fluid-filled sacs that form within the ovary, which can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain and bloating. These symptoms can be mistaken for PCOS since ovarian cysts can develop during ovulation and cause similar symptoms.

If a doctor wrongly identifies the presence of an ovarian cyst as PCOS, then that can lead to a misdiagnosis.

Pcos can be mistaken for other conditions that share similar symptoms, such as hypothyroidism and AOCAH. Besides, some women might have ovarian cysts without having PCOS. Therefore, it is essential to consult with a qualified medical professional for proper diagnosis and treatment, especially if you are experiencing symptoms similar to those of PCOS.

What conditions can be mistaken for PCOS?

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a medical condition that affects a woman’s hormones, menstrual cycle, and ability to conceive. Although PCOS is a common diagnosis, it can be difficult to diagnose, since its symptoms often mimic those of other conditions. Several other conditions can be mistaken for PCOS, including thyroid disorders, adrenal disorders, and other hormonal imbalances.

Thyroid disorders: The thyroid gland is located in the neck and produces hormones that regulate metabolism. Hypothyroidism (an underactive thyroid) and hyperthyroidism (an overactive thyroid) can both cause hormonal imbalances that mimic the symptoms of PCOS. Women with hypothyroidism may experience weight gain, irregular periods, and hair loss, which are also common symptoms of PCOS.

On the other hand, women with hyperthyroidism may experience weight loss, anxiety, and excessive menstrual bleeding, which can also resemble PCOS.

Adrenal disorders: The adrenal glands, located above the kidneys, produce hormones that regulate blood pressure, metabolism, and stress response. One adrenal disorder that can be mistaken for PCOS is congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). This is a genetic condition that causes the adrenal glands to produce too much androgen, resulting in excess body hair, irregular periods, and infertility.

These symptoms are similar to those of PCOS, and a misdiagnosis could lead to ineffective treatment.

Other hormonal imbalances: Women with high levels of prolactin, a hormone that stimulates milk production in the breasts, can experience similar symptoms to women with PCOS. High prolactin levels can cause irregular periods, infertility, and breast discharge, which are also symptoms of PCOS. In addition, women with insulin resistance may also experience symptoms similar to PCOS, including weight gain, irregular periods, and infertility.

There are many conditions that can be mistaken for PCOS due to the similarity of their symptoms. Correct diagnosis is essential, as it determines the appropriate treatment plan. A thorough medical evaluation by a qualified healthcare professional is necessary to distinguish PCOS from other conditions, and in some cases, further testing and evaluations may be necessary to ensure a proper diagnosis.

What can be misdiagnosed as PCOS?

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder among women. It is characterized by symptoms such as irregular menstrual cycles, excessive hair growth, acne, and weight gain. The diagnosis of PCOS is made based on a combination of clinical, laboratory, and ultrasound findings. However, there are many conditions that can mimic the symptoms of PCOS and may lead to a misdiagnosis.

In this answer, we will explore some of the conditions that can be misdiagnosed as PCOS.

1. Hypothyroidism: Hypothyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone. This can lead to symptoms such as irregular menstrual cycles, weight gain, and fatigue, which can be mistaken for PCOS. A simple blood test can be done to check thyroid function and rule out hypothyroidism.

2. Hyperprolactinemia: Hyperprolactinemia is a condition in which the pituitary gland produces too much prolactin hormone. This can disrupt the menstrual cycle and cause milk production in the breasts. These symptoms can be mistaken for PCOS. A blood test can be done to check prolactin levels and rule out hyperprolactinemia.

3. Adrenal disorders: Adrenal disorders such as adrenal hyperplasia or Cushing’s syndrome can lead to symptoms such as irregular menstrual cycles, excessive hair growth, and weight gain. These symptoms can be misdiagnosed as PCOS. A hormonal evaluation can be done to check for adrenal function and rule out adrenal disorders.

4. Ovarian tumors: Ovarian tumors such as granulosa cell tumors or luteomas can cause hormonal imbalances and lead to symptoms such as irregular menstrual cycles and excessive hair growth. These symptoms can be misdiagnosed as PCOS. An ultrasound can be done to check for ovarian tumors and rule out other conditions.

5. Idiopathic hirsutism: Idiopathic hirsutism is a condition in which a woman has excessive hair growth without any underlying hormonal disorder. This can be mistaken for PCOS. A detailed physical examination and hormonal evaluation can help distinguish idiopathic hirsutism from PCOS.

Pcos is a common endocrine disorder among women, but its diagnosis can be challenging as many conditions can mimic its symptoms. A thorough evaluation, including a detailed medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and imaging studies, is essential to make an accurate diagnosis and exclude other conditions that can be misdiagnosed as PCOS.

It is important to consult with a healthcare provider if you are experiencing symptoms that may be related to PCOS or if you have concerns about your health.

Can PCOS be confused with something else?

PCOS, also known as Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, is a hormonal disorder that affects women’s reproductive health. It is a complex condition that involves a range of symptoms, including irregular periods, acne, weight gain, excess hair growth, and infertility, among others. Due to the diversity of its symptoms, PCOS can often be confused with other conditions or disorders.

For instance, symptoms such as irregular periods and acne may lead one to believe that they have hormonal imbalances caused by a thyroid gland problem, or even just simply stress. Similarly, excessive hair growth and weight gain are also symptoms of other conditions, such as Cushing’s syndrome. Therefore, it is essential to consult a medical professional to get a proper diagnosis.

One of the primary issues with PCOS is that there is no single test or marker to diagnose the condition. A diagnosis is typically made based on a combination of medical history, clinical examination, and various laboratory tests. For this reason, PCOS is often misdiagnosed or underdiagnosed, leading to missed opportunities for treatment and management.

Due to its complexity, PCOS can also be misdiagnosed as endometriosis, a condition where the tissue lining the uterus grows outside of it. Endometriosis and PCOS share many common symptoms, including irregular periods and pelvic pain. They can also both cause fertility issues. However, endometriosis is typically associated with more severe pelvic pain symptoms, and PCOS is more widely known for its hormonal imbalances.

In rare cases, PCOS can also be confused with ovarian cancer, a severe and potentially life-threatening condition. PCOS and ovarian cancer share some common symptoms, such as irregular periods, bloating, and pelvic pain. However, ovarian cancer symptoms are often more severe and can include persistent abdominal pain, rapid weight loss, and difficulty eating.

While PCOS is a complex and multifaceted condition, diagnosis is possible with proper evaluation from a medical professional. Although it may seem like other conditions or disorders, such as thyroid gland problems, endometriosis, or ovarian cancer, it is essential to consult a doctor to get the right diagnosis and treatment.

Early diagnosis and treatment for PCOS can help manage symptoms and prevent long-term complications.

Can you have PCOS symptoms but not PCOS?

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder that affects many women, particularly of reproductive age. It is characterized by enlarged ovaries containing numerous small cysts, hormonal imbalances that lead to irregular or absent menstrual cycles, and symptoms such as weight gain, acne, and excess hair growth.

However, it is possible to have some of these symptoms without having PCOS.

Many conditions can cause similar symptoms to PCOS, including thyroid disorders, adrenal disorders, and even depression. Therefore, it is essential to undergo proper medical testing and evaluation to determine the root cause of the symptoms. Additionally, some lifestyle factors such as a sedentary lifestyle or a diet high in carbohydrates and sugar can lead to weight gain or insulin resistance, which can contribute to some PCOS symptoms.

Receiving an accurate diagnosis is crucial for appropriate treatment and management of any medical condition. Therefore, it is always recommended to seek medical advice for any persistent symptoms or concerns that may affect your overall health and wellbeing.

What do you rule out before diagnosing PCOS?

Before diagnosing PCOS, there are certain conditions that need to be ruled out. These conditions include thyroid diseases, hyperprolactinemia, non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia, and Cushing’s syndrome. This is important because these conditions can have similar symptoms to PCOS, such as irregular periods, acanthosis nigricans, and hirsutism.

Thyroid diseases, for example, can cause menstrual cycle abnormalities, weight gain or weight loss, and fatigue – all symptoms that can also be present in women with PCOS. Hyperprolactinemia is another condition that can cause irregular menstrual cycles and lead to infertility as a result of the suppression of ovulation.

This condition is caused by an overproduction of prolactin, which is a hormone that is involved in lactation.

Non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia can also mimic the symptoms of PCOS. This is a condition where the adrenal glands produce too much or too little of certain hormones, such as cortisol or androgens. Common symptoms of this condition include irregular periods, hirsutism, and acne.

Finally, Cushing’s syndrome is a rare condition that can cause excessive weight gain, acne, and hirsutism. It is caused by the overproduction of cortisol, which is a hormone that is involved in stress response and metabolism.

In order to properly diagnose PCOS, it is important to rule out these conditions first, as well as conduct a thorough medical history and physical exam. Blood tests and imaging studies may also be used to help confirm a diagnosis of PCOS. By ruling out these other conditions, healthcare providers can ensure that patients receive the appropriate treatment for their specific condition, leading to better health outcomes.

Can PCOS be misdiagnosed by ultrasound?

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder that affects women of reproductive age. One of the diagnostic tools for PCOS is the ultrasound examination of the ovaries. The ultrasound scan helps doctors to assess the size and number of follicles in the ovaries to detect any abnormality.

However, PCOS can be misdiagnosed by ultrasound in some cases, which can lead to delayed or incorrect treatment.

One of the reasons for misdiagnosis is that ovarian cysts are not unique to PCOS. Women who do not have PCOS may also develop ovarian cysts, which can be seen on an ultrasound scan. Therefore, it is possible for a woman who has ovarian cysts to be mistakenly diagnosed with PCOS due to the apparent presence of multiple cysts on an ultrasound examination.

Another reason for misdiagnosis is the criteria used to define PCOS. According to the Rotterdam Criteria, a woman with PCOS must have at least two of the following: irregular menstrual cycles, clinical and/or biochemical signs of hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovaries seen on ultrasound. However, some women with PCOS may not have polycystic ovaries or may have a normal ovarian appearance on the scan.

In such cases, the diagnosis can be missed or delayed, leading to ineffective treatment.

Additionally, the expertise of the ultrasound operator can affect the accuracy of the diagnosis. The technician or radiologist performing the scan must have sufficient training and experience in identifying polycystic ovaries and distinguishing them from other types of cysts. An inexperienced operator may overlook subtle differences in the ovarian morphology and miss the diagnosis or erroneously diagnose an ovarian cyst as PCOS.

While ultrasound is a useful tool in the diagnosis of PCOS, it is not foolproof and can sometimes lead to misdiagnosis. Healthcare professionals should exercise caution and follow the Rotterdam Criteria closely while interpreting the ultrasound results. Further clinical evaluation and testing, such as hormonal assays and medical history, may be necessary to confirm or exclude a diagnosis of PCOS.

What is the difference between PCOS and Cushings?

PCOS, which stands for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, and Cushing’s Syndrome are two different medical conditions that affect the hormonal balance in the body. Although they may share some similar symptoms, there are distinct differences between these two conditions.

PCOS is a hormonal disorder that affects women of reproductive age. The exact cause of PCOS is not clear, but it is believed to be linked to insulin resistance, genetics, and lifestyle factors. PCOS is characterized by the presence of multiple cysts on the ovaries, irregular menstrual cycles, and elevated levels of androgens (male hormones) in the body.

Women with PCOS may experience weight gain, acne, excessive hair growth, and infertility.

On the other hand, Cushing’s Syndrome is a rare disorder caused by the excessive production of cortisol, a hormone that is produced by the adrenal glands. Cushing’s Syndrome can be caused by a tumor on the pituitary gland, adrenal gland, or from taking steroids for a long period of time. The symptoms of Cushing’s Syndrome include weight gain, weakness, fatigue, high blood pressure, and the development of a “buffalo hump” between the shoulders.

The main difference between these two conditions is the underlying cause. PCOS is caused by hormonal imbalances and insulin resistance, while Cushing’s Syndrome is caused by the overproduction of cortisol. Additionally, PCOS is more common among women of reproductive age, whereas Cushing’s Syndrome affects both men and women equally and can occur at any age.

Diagnosing both PCOS and Cushing’s Syndrome can be challenging, as the symptoms can be similar to other medical conditions. Doctors may use a combination of physical exams, blood tests, ultrasounds, and imaging tests to make a diagnosis.

Pcos and Cushing’s Syndrome are two different medical conditions that affect the hormonal balance in the body. While they may share similar symptoms, the underlying causes and demographics affected differ. It is important to seek medical attention and proper diagnosis for both conditions to receive effective treatment.

Can PCOS be mistaken for thyroid problems?

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and thyroid problems are two common conditions that affect women. Both disorders can lead to hormonal imbalances, affecting the way that the endocrine system works in the body. PCOS and thyroid problems may share some symptoms, leading to a risk of misdiagnosis.

PCOS is a hormonal disorder that affects women of reproductive age. It is characterized by high levels of androgens (male hormones) and insulin resistance. This can cause symptoms such as irregular periods, ovarian cysts, weight gain, acne, and excess hair growth. While the exact causes of PCOS are still unknown, genetic factors and insulin resistance are believed to play a role in its development.

On the other hand, thyroid disorders can come in the form of both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Hyperthyroidism occurs when the thyroid gland produces too much thyroid hormone, leading to symptoms such as weight loss, anxiety, tremors, and irregular heartbeat. Hypothyroidism, on the other hand, occurs when the thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough hormone, leading to symptoms such as weight gain, hair loss, fatigue, constipation, and depression.

While PCOS and thyroid disorders have some similar symptoms, there are key differences between the two conditions. For example, women with PCOS often have irregular periods, whereas women with thyroid issues usually have either too heavy or too light periods. Additionally, women with PCOS tend to have excess body hair and acne, whereas these symptoms are not typically associated with thyroid disorders.

It is possible, however, for PCOS and thyroid disorders to coexist in some cases. Women with PCOS have a higher risk of developing thyroid disease compared to women without PCOS. This is because both disorders can affect hormonal balance and have overlapping symptoms. In some cases, a woman may be diagnosed with one condition but actually have both, leading to a risk of misdiagnosis.

Therefore, it is important for women who experience symptoms of PCOS or thyroid problems to seek medical attention from a healthcare professional. The doctor will typically perform a physical exam, review the patient’s medical history and family history, and may order blood tests and imaging tests to diagnose the underlying condition.

A proper diagnosis can help ensure that the right treatment is given, and that any potential complications are minimized.

What does polycystic ovaries look like on ultrasound?

Polycystic ovaries on ultrasound appear as a cluster of small, fluid-filled sacs or cysts. The ovaries may be larger than normal and have an irregular shape due to the multiple cysts present. The cysts are usually less than 1 cm in size but can vary in size and number. Additionally, the follicles that contain eggs in the ovary may be immature and fail to fully mature and release during ovulation.

This can lead to irregular menstrual cycles or ovulatory dysfunction in affected women. Ultrasound can be helpful in detecting polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and is often used by healthcare providers to diagnose the condition. However, it is important to note that not all women with PCOS have visible cysts on ultrasound and diagnosis requires additional criteria to be met, including symptoms such as irregular periods, excess hair growth or acne, and hormonal imbalances.

What is the new name for PCOS?

In 2013, the Androgen Excess and PCOS Society (AE-PCOS Society) introduced a new name for PCOS, called the “Androgen Excess and PCOS” (AE-PCOS) syndrome. This new name was proposed to better reflect the underlying hormonal imbalances that contribute to this condition. PCOS, or Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, is a complex endocrine disorder that affects up to 10% of women of reproductive age.

It is characterized by three main features – hyperandrogenism (excess male hormone levels), ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries (enlarged ovaries with numerous small fluid-filled sacs called follicles).

The term “Androgen Excess” in AE-PCOS refers to the excess of male hormones, including testosterone, that is often seen in women with PCOS. This hormone imbalance can lead to a range of symptoms, including hirsutism (excessive hair growth), acne, hair loss, and menstrual irregularities. Moreover, research has shown that this hormonal imbalance can increase the risk of other health problems such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and endometrial cancer.

The change in name reflects a shift in understanding of the condition from being purely focused on reproductive health to being an endocrine disorder with long-term health implications. The AI-PCOS Society hopes that this new name will improve the recognition and understanding of the underlying hormonal imbalances in PCOS, leading to better diagnosis and management of the condition.

Is polycystic ovaries worse than endometriosis?

Both polycystic ovaries and endometriosis are gynecological conditions that can have negative impacts on a woman’s health and quality of life. However, it is difficult to say which condition is worse as each presents its unique set of symptoms and complications.

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal condition that results in enlarged ovaries with multiple small cysts. Women with PCOS often experience irregular menstrual cycles, an excess of male hormones, and insulin resistance. These hormonal imbalances can cause weight gain, acne, and excessive hair growth, among other symptoms.

One of the major complications of PCOS is infertility, as irregular ovulation and hormonal imbalances make it difficult for women to conceive. Additionally, women with PCOS have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol, and heart disease.

In contrast, endometriosis is a condition where tissue similar to the lining of the uterus grows outside of the uterus, causing pain and discomfort. Women with endometriosis often experience debilitating menstrual cramps, pain during sex, and pain in the abdomen or lower back. In severe cases, endometriosis can lead to infertility or bowel and bladder problems.

While both conditions can impact a woman’s reproductive system and overall health, the severity of each case can vary greatly. Some women with PCOS may experience mild symptoms and are able to manage their condition with lifestyle changes and medication, while others may require more aggressive treatments such as fertility treatments or surgery.

Similarly, the severity of endometriosis can vary greatly, with some women requiring only pain management while others may require surgical intervention to remove the excess tissue.

It is also important to note that the impact of these conditions on a woman’s life can extend beyond physical symptoms. Both polycystic ovaries and endometriosis can have a negative impact on a woman’s emotional well-being, particularly when infertility is a concern.

Both PCOS and endometriosis can be challenging conditions that negatively impact a woman’s health and quality of life. However, it is difficult to say which condition is worse as each presents its unique set of symptoms and complications. Treatment plans should be tailored to each individual woman’s needs and concerns.

Is it possible I was misdiagnosed with PCOS?

It is certainly possible that you were misdiagnosed with PCOS. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is a common hormonal disorder that affects women, and it is characterized by the development of multiple cysts in the ovaries. Women with PCOS may also experience other physical and hormonal changes, such as irregular periods, excess hair growth, acne, and insulin resistance.

However, the symptoms of PCOS can vary from person to person, and some women may not have all of the typical symptoms. Additionally, other conditions, such as thyroid disorders, adrenal disorders, and other hormonal imbalances, can mimic some of the symptoms of PCOS.

To determine whether or not you have PCOS, your doctor may perform a series of tests, including blood tests to check hormone levels, an ultrasound to examine your ovaries, and a physical exam. It is possible that the results of these tests could be misinterpreted, leading to a misdiagnosis.

If you are concerned that you may have been misdiagnosed with PCOS, it is important to speak to your doctor about your concerns. They can advise you on whether or not you should undergo further testing or seek a second opinion from a specialist. It may also be helpful to keep a record of your symptoms and any changes you experience over time, as this can help your doctor make an accurate diagnosis.

it is important to work closely with your healthcare provider to ensure that you receive appropriate treatment and care for your specific health needs.

How does an ultrasound confirm PCOS?

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder in women that affects their reproductive health. It is characterized by the presence of multiple small fluid-filled sacs, called cysts, on the ovaries. While the exact cause of PCOS is unknown, the hormonal imbalances in the body play a crucial role in its development.

One of the ways to diagnose PCOS is through ultrasound imaging. Ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of the body’s internal organs, including the ovaries. Ultrasound is a non-invasive and painless procedure, making it an ideal tool for diagnosing PCOS.

During an ultrasound for the diagnosis of PCOS, the patient lies down on an examination table, and a special probe is inserted into the vagina. This probe emits high-frequency sound waves that bounce off the ovaries and create an image on the ultrasound machine.

An ultrasound can confirm the presence of multiple small cysts on the surface of the ovaries, which are one of the hallmark features of PCOS. Polycystic ovaries are typically larger than normal ovaries, and the cysts are usually less than one centimeter in diameter. The ultrasound imaging also helps to assess the size and shape of the ovaries and to identify any other abnormalities, such as tumors or growths.

Furthermore, an ultrasound can also help to evaluate the thickness and appearance of the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. Women with PCOS often have irregular menstrual cycles, which can lead to problems with the endometrium, such as thickening or irregular shedding. Thus, ultrasound can provide useful diagnostic information about the menstrual cycle and reproductive health.

An ultrasound is a valuable tool for the diagnosis of PCOS. It can confirm the presence of the characteristic small cysts on the ovaries, assess the size and appearance of the ovaries, and evaluate the thickness and appearance of the endometrium. These insights can help to identify the underlying hormonal imbalances in the body and guide appropriate treatment options for women with PCOS.

What does PCOS look like on a pelvic ultrasound?

Polycystic ovary syndrome, commonly known as PCOS, is a hormonal disorder that affects women’s reproductive age. One of the characteristic features of PCOS is enlarged ovaries that develop multiple small follicles or cysts on them. These cysts contain immature eggs that may not develop fully, causing difficulties in ovulation and fertility.

Pelvic ultrasound is a common diagnostic tool used to diagnose PCOS. The imaging technique uses ultrasound waves to produce detailed images of the pelvic area, including the uterus and ovaries. On a pelvic ultrasound, PCOS will appear as enlarged ovaries with multiple small cysts. In addition to the number of cysts, their size and location may also be noted.

Typically, a normal ovary on a pelvic ultrasound is between 2-3 cm in length. In comparison, Polycystic ovaries are typically larger than normal, usually measuring more than 3 cm in diameter. Multiple small, round, fluid-filled cysts of varying sizes are scattered on the surface of the ovaries, which can be easily visualized through pelvic ultrasound.

These cysts appear as small black spots and are seen along with multiple follicles around the ovarian circumference.

Moreover, the measurement of the stromal or functional tissue that makes up the ovary is an important indicator for diagnosing PCOS. In PCOS, this tissue may appear to be thicker and more prominent than normal. The thickness of the stroma is an important predictor of ovarian function and increased follicle formation, indicating the severity of the condition.

In addition to the ovaries, doctors may also look at other pelvic structures including the endometrial lining, fallopian tubes and uterus during a pelvic ultrasound to rule out other conditions that may mimic PCOS.

Pelvic ultrasound is an essential diagnostic tool for PCOS due to the characteristic appearance of ovaries that significantly differs from normal ovaries. The visualization of multiple cysts and enlarged ovaries strongly indicates Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, which can be used to identify the condition and initiate proper treatment.

Resources

  1. 4 myths about PCOS and why they are wrong
  2. Is it PCOS or something else? A gynae talks about other …
  3. Six common misdiagnoses for PCOS – Pollie
  4. Differential Diagnosis of PCOS – Verywell Health
  5. My Personal Struggle after Being Misdiagnosed with PCOS